Draws Raspberry PI Hat

With patience (over 6 months) my Draws Hat has finally arrived from NW Digital Radio. I also ordered a GPS mouse.

DRAWS is a platform with multiple components.

First, it is a Raspberry Pi HAT.  This is a purely hardware solution that puts several components that are useful for amateur radio projects on a single board; namely a high-performance sound chip (CODEC), a GPS with pulse per second (PPS) that includes an embedded battery backed real-time clock (RTC), and a 12VDC power circuit to power the onboard devices and the Raspberry Pi from a single power supply.  It has two mini DIN-6 audio sockets that match the ‘TNC’ specification found on many radios designed for amateur radio, an SMA connector for a powered GPS LNA antenna, power connection socket, and a small GPIO array for additional I/O.

Secondly, the DRAWS Workstation, which is the HAT plus an SD Card, Raspberry Pi, and an optional metal case, which creates a self-contained unit.  The Raspberry Pi provides the computing power for the workstation to run the drivers for the HAT components and applications to provide various functions.  Those functions are mostly in the realm of packet radio (Direwolf modem, AX.25, APRS, etc.), other digital modes (fldigi, WSJT-X, etc.), and digital voice (D-STAR, etc.), and ancillary utilities and applications such as a Stratum 1 timeserver, GPS location, and so forth.

Is there a prebuilt image for DRAWS?

Get the current beta at http://images.nwdigitalradio.com/downloads (current_beta.zip) and follow Getting Started

Starting with delivery of the DRAWS HAT, a downloadable image will be available to run the DRAWS workstation.  It will contain the current version of Raspbian (Stretch) including preloaded DRAWS HAT driver and a selection of applications that have been compiled for and tested on the DRAWS platform.

© http://nwdigitalradio.com/draws/

At the moment I use the Draws Hat for Aprs, because I am still busy trying out the possibilities of the Draws Hat. For this I use Direwolf and Yaac.

KPC3 Non Plus

Today I have been playing around with a KPC3 Non +. I bought this KPC3 in America and the upgrade Firmware in England. So you can imagine that it was not cheap.

So now we are going to insert the new Firmware.

I am very happy that it works perfectly. Now I want to do a comparison test with direwolf. Both with the 6.0 Firmware version and the 8.2 Firmware version. First, let’s find some time to get involved (again) with the hobby

KPC-3/9612/Kam Firmware upgrade

OMG…. How

(IK5FKA, Still Alive & Kicking) Tnx for the mail.

I am busy with a number of large projects, so I have very little time for the hobby. In my daily life I work as a Welder and I am used to working with large materials.

And I get scared of the little NinoTNC and parts I received. I know where to start, but I’m scared of squeezing that little thing completely. Or that everything is soldered together. I hope I can find some time this weekend to find out which part should go where and start soldering.

shit ….. i’m very afraid. Wish me luck.

Firmware Kantronics

Firmware for the Kantronics KPC3 Non + and the KPC9612 Non + also the Kam.

Firmware For KPC-3

KPC-3 (non plus) 5.0 Firmware
KPC-3 (non plus) 5.1 Firmware
KPC-3 (non plus) 6.0 Firmware
KPC-3 (non plus) 8.2 Firmware

Manuals

KPC-3 (non plus) Manual
KPC-3 v8.2 Rom Manual Addendum

Firmware for other Kantronics TNC’s:

KPC-9612 (non plus) v6.0 Firmware
KPC-9612 (non plus) v7.0 Firmware
KPC-9612 (non plus) v8.2 Firmware

KAM v5.0 Firmware
KAM v6.1 Firmware
KAM+ v8.0 Firmware
KAM+ v8.2 Firmware
KAM+ All Firmware, Schematic, & Parts List

KPC-2 v5.02 Firmware, Schematic, & Parts List
KPC-4 v5.01 Firmware, Schematic, & Parts List

Linux Port of UZ7HO’s Soundmodem

Very good news, John G8BPQ has ported Soundmodem from UZ7HO to Linux.

Mail from John G8BPQ.

Andy UZ7HO has allowed me to port his Soundmodem to C so that it can be run run Linux systems. See

https://www.cantab.net/users/john.wiseman/Documents/QtSoundModem.html

This is pre-Beta software. It has been tested by several people but is likely to still have bugs.

73,
John G8BPQ

NinoTnc N96003A Pre-Order

It is now possible to order the NinoTNC as a Pre-Order. It is expected to be delivered in May.
Order it at… https://www.etsy.com/listing/771765516/preorder-n9600a3-circuit-board-and-cpu

I ordered two, I am very curious. Just wait for the B.O.M (Bill Of Materials)file and then I can order the components.

PRE ORDER LISTING–PLEASE READ: This is a revision of the N9600A that eliminates the need for a USB-serial daughter board, which is now in short supply in the US. This PCB, N9600A3, provides pads to use an MCP2221A-I/P USB bridge on-board, along with a USB-B connector. I expect to have stock ready to ship in May 2020, but that date may extend due to current global events interrupting supply chains.

More information about this device is available here: http://tarpn.net/t/nino-tnc/nino-tnc.html

This kit contains the printed circuit board and programmed dsPIC CPU required to build one TARPN N9600A3 packet radio terminal node controller (TNC). This kit does not include any other parts from the bill of materials, you will have to obtain more parts from a supplier to build a complete working TNC. Basic electronics tools and skills will be required to assemble a working TNC. You’ll need to be competent with a soldering iron, and have a supply of small-gauge solder. Side cutters will be necessary, as well as tweezers or needle-nose pliers.

The PCB is a high-quality 4-layer board with blue finish and white silkscreen for part locations and identifiers. It requires only thru-hole parts for assembly.

Once assembled, the N9600A3 TNC acts as a multi-mode data modem you can use to create narrow-band datalinks with VHF and UHF communication radios. The N9600A3 TNC sends and receives data using several user-selectable modulation methods and link protocols: traditional AX.25 modes at 1200 bps AFSK (like APRS) and 9600 bps using GMSK (compatible with the G3RUH standard).

N9600A3 differs from previous revision with the incorporation of an on-board USB bridge and USB-B connector, as well as 2 more DIP switch options that will enable several future firmware features that are under development now. All these future firmware upgrades will be supported in N9600A2 as well, through KISS options (N9600A2 does not have as many switches).

The TNC also supports an experimental layer 2 protocol called IL2P which incorporates several improvements, including Forward Error Correction. IL2P can be used as an alternative to AX.25 on both 1200 AFSK and 9600 GMSK modes. You can read more about IL2P here:

http://tarpn.net/t/il2p/il2p.html

9600 bps GMSK will not work with all voice-band radios. It requires a radio with a data port (direct modulator/discriminator connection) or other wide-bandwidth connection. It should be possible to use 1200 bps AFSK mode with most voice-band radios, once you have obtained (or made) suitable connection cables.

You can find more information about this TNC, build instructions, bill of materials, configuration tips, and a community of users at the following links:

http://tarpn.net/t/nino-tnc/nino-tnc.html
https://groups.io/g/ninotnc/topics

Some disclaimers: We are selling this kit at very close to our cost, in the hopes of growing the Terrestrial Amateur Radio Packet Network (TARPN) and the entire packet radio community. You must assemble and use this device at your own risk. Operation of any radio device on the Amateur Radio bands requires applicable licensing by the government of the country where the device is used. If you damage the PCB or CPU beyond repair during assembly or use, you’ll need to pony up another $7.57 plus shipping to order a replacement. We do not guarantee suitability for use for commercial purposes. Do not use this device as part of a life-saving system.

I hope that you enjoy assembling and using this device, and grow a packet radio network where you live!

73,
Nino
KK4HEJ

TheFirmWare and The Firmware PC Extended

Firmwares For TNC2C, TNC2C-H, TNC2S and TNC2H with EPROMs

The Firmware PC Extended

Download TFPCR

Download TFPCX

Download TFWin

 

Direwolf <> AEA PK88

144.800Mhz @ 1200Baud (Test on 03-29-20 11:00 (rx only))

Today I did a reception test with the AEA PK88 and Direwolf. I must say that I am impressed with the PK88. This is the best test I have done so far. Now the conditions were not optimal, there is very little traffic at the time. So I will probably test it again at a busier time. Even now I let the reception run for half an hour.

So we missed 19 packets out of a total of 211 packtes from Direwolf. This compared to the tnc3s that missed 73 out of 219 packets from Direwolf.
Below again the TNC3s comparison with Direwolf.

It is nice to see that this AEA PK-88 performs so well after all these years and different owners.

The last week I save all the Aprs traffic I receive and post it on a blog. You might like to take a look there. https://pd9q.blogspot.com