Xnet axudp link Jnos

The axudp link from xnet to jnos has caused a lot of problems.
But he is up and running … Here the explanation.

In the line “attach axudp xnet 256 192.168.1.112” (jnos) is the secret.
This must therefore “not” refer to the ip address of xnet like you
have indicated in ip.net at myip, but to the IP address of Linux itself.
So the ip address of (for example) eth0

Autoexec.nos (Jnos)

Eth0 (Linux)

Ip.net (xnet)

Autoboot.net (xnet)

 

(X)Net IP.NET

A small example of IP.NET from (X) Net

(X)Net Crontab

Here a small example of the crontab of (X) Net

(X)Net autoexec.net

 

(X)Net autoboot.net

 

Start (X)Net/kissattach/slip at boot

I have written the startup script below so that all services are started. Now of course it is nice if this also happens when booting the server. First the start script.

Now I have created the following file in /etc/init.d with the name xnet.

Now it has to be added.
update-rc.d xnet defaults
update-rc.d xnet enable

Well, reboot and see if everything is alright.

(X)Net slip link linux

Well here I have been working on it for a while. Because (new) Linux works with master /dev/pmtx and slave /dev/pts/? it is not always easy to find out which slave you will be assigned. Custom programs such as kissattach that give the slave with stdout. Now slattach does not suffer from it unfortunately. Oh well in Debian than.

I use the following program to create a master and slave.

I have added the code below. Because I would like the pts to be written down in a file.

As you can see above, the pts are displayed with printf and they are written in /tmp/slip. Well here I wanted to go. Now I can read the file. Here I use the following in my start script of (X) Net.

With the command “sed” the PTS is adjusted in AUTOBOOT.NET. Now I do not have to worry about what pts I get assigned.